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A A A A Author Topic: Flogging a dead horse: Motorcycle Oil vs Regular Oils  (Read 4695 times)

Jake

Flogging a dead horse: Motorcycle Oil vs Regular Oils
« Started on: 20-Nov-13, 22:15 »

Hey All,


So I've done my best in researching what oil to use in my new CX500. From all I've read on this forum and on others, i'm very well aware that I'm flogging that poor bastard of a horse again.

So to keep things short and in an attempt not revisit what's already been said, my question is this; Why are so many users on the forum using oils that are recommended for Cars, 4wd's etc over a dedicated Motorcycle Oil?

From what I can gather all sources point to the latter, unless I have miss read something.

Just for the recored either way I've decided what oil I want to use based on what I've read here, so no need to get into that.

Cheers


Jake

Mins Man

My excuse is that I'm a tightarse and honestly believe that these engines don't need to be pampered with expensive oils.
Any reasonable quality mineral oil is OK in my opinion, but I do think you should avoid Safeways's Home brand oil.

hamilton

In the late 60s i ran an Esso service station and they said that very few oil brands have their own refinery, ie Castrol,Valvoline etc, they buy oil from the producer and include their own additives, Esso also said that if they could hold more additives in suspension and thus get a better product they would do so but most of the whiz bang stuff separated out , i saw this with engines which had used Castrol GTX all their life and had pockets of grey substance every where, they would not let me sell Castrol even when customers requested it so i stored it in Esso drums.
My excuse is that I'm a tightarse and honestly believe that these engines don't need to be pampered with expensive oils.
Any reasonable quality mineral oil is OK in my opinion, but I do think you should avoid Safeways's Home brand oil.

Onetrack

Would it be right to assume that "motorcycle" oils are designed to cater for air cooled engines with their unequal cooling unlike ours.  "Motorcycle" oil might also cater for gearbox and clutch in the engine oil something not encountered in car engines.  Still our engines are not as stressed as current motorcycle engines and supper expensive oil is not required.

"Young" Les F

Staffy

The answer's simple - because these oils work.  happy0062

BUFF7454

How many cars do you know that have their clutches running around in the engine oil. bike oils are designed to be compatable with wet clutches. car oils aren't . Car oil may be Ok if you have a Ducati with it's rattly dry clutch but you are asking for trouble in most bikes as the additives in car oil find their way into the plates and stuff them.

Mins Man

That's a valid point Buff, but I haven't encountered any problems so far using good mineral oils in my bikes for the last 6 years or so.
The one problem I have met is when I tried a semi-synthetic oil in my Turbo.
It made for harsher changes and until the engine had run for a couple of minutes from cold, it wouldn't go into gear without stalling. An oil change fixed it.

CX PHREAK

I only use plain mineral oil - and change it frequently. The beauty of this oil is its lack of additives and it is these additives that will potentially give greif with the clutch.

 So... they can stick their $65 for 4 litres of silkolene and the like. I'll use $25 per 5 litre Repco oil and save my money.

Jake

Cheers guys, that's pretty much got my head around it!

I'm interested in getting some better oil into it, have a feeling the last owner threw what ever he had lying around in there.

Cheers

Jake

thirsty

Use the cheapest oil you can find (without additives) and change it often. Change the filter every second oil change and you'll not have any issues.  My first Blackbird was ridden pretty hard by the original owner and myself and we used el cheapo Shell mineral oil changed every 3000K or so and it never skipped a beat. Bike had 70 something K when I sold it and still going strong.

Shafted

I used Harley Davidson mineral oil for a while then switched to Shell mineral. The Shell stuff made the clutch slip under heavy load in 4th, but that's stopped over time. I'll be changing my oil after next Sunday's track bash as long as the bike survives  fietsertour

Staffy

I also use Repco like CX Phreak but unlike Thirsty I change my filter every time I dump the oil.  I switched to this from other more fancy oils and have had less of the issues I was having since.

Mins Man

As previously mentioned, I'm a bit of a tight arse, so I usually wait until Supercheap have a sale and stock up on Valvoline  oils.

Canuck13

How many cars do you know that have their clutches running around in the engine oil. bike oils are designed to be compatable with wet clutches. car oils aren't . Car oil may be Ok if you have a Ducati with it's rattly dry clutch but you are asking for trouble in most bikes as the additives in car oil find their way into the plates and stuff them.

Or a wet clutch two stroke which just runs the clutch and tranny in oil. . . .

Or my dry clutch honda NSR which just runs gear oil.....

 2coolsmiley

coen

I've just drained the penrite hpr gas 10 out of my shadow and gone back to the repco 15w-40. Engine is quieter and smoother and the gear selection is easier and noticeably smoother. No more clunck that appeared when i lasted refilled with the hpr gas 10. It was only in for about 400k's till i decided to go back to the trusty repco., I reckon the hpr gas 10 is a good oil, just to thin for a cx with a few k's on it. Both gambit's shadow and mine love the repco oil.

Rayman

agrred - the HPR is thinner than the 10W would indicate -
people say to add another 5 to the number -
so for a CX with some kms on it - hpr 20 - 25 would be better -

I changed to various things - whatever suits but normally 20W or so.
the Vfs i run 15 -20 as its more important to get the oil to the top of the engine quickly -

Rayman

hamilton

Its very difficult to interpret viscosity numbers,thinking i was doing the best for my car engine i was using Castrol GTX, having drained the oil one weekend i discovered i didnt have enough GTX for a customer next day, so with a heavy heart i put in Castrol XL [much thinner according to the numbers] to my astonishment i had much higher oil pressure with the engine hot and so only used  XL from there on.I now buy my oil from Woolworths, i dont look at the numbers, only the price!

Joolstacho

The cynic in me tells me that what you get in 'dedicated' motorcycle oils is probably normal car oil without the additives that make our clutches slip, -and cor, they don't 'arf know how to charge for it!

hamilton

The cynic in me tells me that what you get in 'dedicated' motorcycle oils is probably normal car oil without the additives that make our clutches slip, -and cor, they don't 'arf know how to charge for it!
  Agreed,now its possible to buy detergent especially formulated to clean your RUBBISH bin,, nuff sed!

CX PHREAK

Alvin Toffler foretold of this in his book Future shock. He called it overchoice and it makes a trip to the supermarket, hardware store etc. a nightmare unless you develop tunnel vision.

 It also chokes our cupboards up with products we hardly ever use.

 Ahhh... capitalism.... rolleye0012

Staffy

Not my cupboards.   rolleye0012  Guitars...check.  Food..... check..... bike.... check.... clothes..... yep.  Sorted  happy0062

madmechanic

I used to work for repco from 1987 through to 1991 , back then Valvoline and later pensoil used to make the repco oil and I used it in everything as it was super cheap but I did change it at around 5000 klms inc new filters and most my engines had very clean oil after a few changed no more dirty oil and I have run car oils mostly Valvoline oil in hundreds of bikes and never had a single clutch failure. I did run it to 10 thousand in some of my old ford escorts but always changed it when it looked a little dirty and never suffered any failures despite revving the life out of them .
funny enough in the mid to late 1980s I ran Mobil friction modified oils in a lot of small capacity road bikes and a lot of dirt bikes up to 500 cc and never had a single clutch slip and none of the bikes were new every one was second hand with decent miles for a small bike up around 40 to 70 thousand klms. funny enough I had a old 1978 Yamaha XS250 with a 2 into 1 exhaust and a strait through pipe that I used to rev to 10900 rpm before the valves would hit the pistons with a nasty rattle as i was trying to blow it up as my dad said if I blew the 250 I could fit the 400 engine I had but in 28 thousand klms it refused to blow up yet it would keep with and have more top speed than the then hottie the gsx250 and vt250s yet most considered them the most gutless slugs . I guess most people are just too scared to rev a engine. the cx500 is a classic example. many of my friends have said what a gutless old piece of ***** yet id be there in their mirrors all the time and often pass them in corners because they were just afraid to rev a engine and the vast majority of riders cant realy ride. anyone can open up a throttle on a dead strait piece of road but only a fraction of bike riders can actually ride and I attribute this to riding old crappy bikes where if your not a good rider you die young.

grod

I use Mobil 1 in my mower and notice no difference in performance.  I can't compare this with other oils as I have never used them in the mowet I suspect there will be little or no difference in the appearence of my lawn.

love

g

Onetrack

I take my fleet of little Hondas for a walk around the garden frequently at this time of year and the oil type makes no difference no mater which mower, brush cutter or cultivator I use the grass still grows.  lmao   Even the generator makes no difference.

"Young" Les F

hamilton

What do you feed the DALEK,

 


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